cpp_banner_2004t
#Page Contents#Folder Contents#Translations#Email this page#Search
List Realms
Home
Education
Positive Practices
Learning by Design
Research and Evaluation
List Related Folders
Bilingual Education
College Preparation
Educational Technology
Legislation
Rural Education
Teaching Resources
Index: Educational Technology

Research Instruments

Page Contents

Computer Attitudes   dot   Computer Literacy   dot   Computer Efficacy   dot   Others Measures of Interest


Computer Attitudes

Bear, George Others (1987). Bath County Computer Attitudes Survey. (ETS# TC016027 ) Designed to measure the attitudes of students in grades four through twelve toward computers. be used in conjunction with two other instruments to determine the factors in the students' background which affect their attitudes toward computers. The first is a questionnaire concerning students' computer experience and usage, educational and career plans, and favorite school subjects. The second is the Elementary Form of the Estes Attitude Scales (TC 011265), which is used to assess students' attitudes toward school subjects. Test Acronyms: BCCAS Grade Level(s): 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12. Material Notes: 1. Article reprint. See availability source. General Notes: ITEMS: 26.

Levine, Tamar Donitsa-Schmidt, Smadar (1997). Computer Attitudes and Self-Confidence Questionnaire. (ETS# TC922033) The Computer Attitudes and Self-Confidence Questionnaire was designed to measure seventh through twelfth grade students' attitudes and self-confidence toward computer use. It was designed to test the hypothesis that positive computer attitudes and confidence lead to a commitment to learning to use computers. Students indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with the questionnaire's 42 items on a 5-point, Likert-type scale. The questionnaire measures seven dimisions: computer self-confidence; attitudes towards the computer as an educational tool; general computer-related stereotypical attitudes; perception of the computer as a tool of enjoyment; appreciation of the computer as an important tool; perception of the computer as a human friend; and comptuer-related sex stereotype attitudes. Studies using the instrument have found a positive correlation between students' computer attitudes and learning to use computers, but a negative correlation between students' self-confidence regarding computers and their willingness to learn to use them. Technical data included. (KM) Material Notes: 1. Article reprint. See availability source. Contact: Journal of Educational Computing Research, 0735-6331, 16, 1, 83-105, 1997.

Raub, Annalyse Callahan (1981). Attitudes About Computers. (ETS# TC017858 ETS#) Attitudes about Computers was designed to answer the question, What attitudes and beliefs do students have about computers that cause them to feel anxious? The questionnaire was administered to 220 undergraduates from 4 colleges. It uses a Likert-type scale and has 62 items. Reliability and validity are discussed in the dissertation. (JW) Test Acronyms: TIM(Y) Material Notes: 1. Raub, Annalyse Callahan, CORRELATES OF COMPUTER ANXIETY IN COLLEGE STUDENTS, Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1981. Contact: Educational Testing Service (ETS) Test Collection Library Rosedale and Carter Roads Princeton, NJ 08541 (609) 734-5689

Toris, Carol (1984). Computer Anxiety Questionnaire. (ETS# TC014724) This questionnaire measure of computer anxiety is in four parts: the projective Toris Draw-a-Computer Test, a computer knowledge test, a measure of behaviors toward computers and another of attitudes toward computers. It has been used with students at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. The knowledge level test is based on information presented in a college level introductory computing course. Grade Level(s): Higher Education. General Notes: TIME: 10.
#prev#next#top#bottom

Computer Literacy

Griswold, Philip A. (1983). Computer Use Questionnaire. (ETS# TC018329) An instrument to measure computer literacy among teachers. It consists of 20 items and is based on a 3-part rating scale with response options ranging from "strongly agree to strongly disagree". Several characteristics of teachers, including social implications, related to the awareness of computer use are identified. These characteristics include mathematical skills, age, and sex. Psychological attributes have also been identified as being associated with computer use in education. These attributes are locus of control, extraversion and apprehension of computer technology, cognitive style, and perceived effectiveness of computer managed instruction. The Minnesota Educational computer consortium (MECC) has organized a set of criteria to describe computer literacy: computer applications, limitations, software, programming, and enjoyment. (TJS) Test Acronyms: MECC Material Notes: 1. Journal Article "Some Determinants of Computer Awareness Among Education Majors". See avail source. Contact: Association For Educational Data System (AEDA) Journal;, 16, 2, 92-103,

Lockheed, Marlaine Others (1983). Computer Literacy: Definition and Survey Items for Assessment in Schools. (ETS# TC013636) This item bank was designed for use with elementary and secondary school superintendents, principals, teachers and students to assess the status of computer literacy in the educational system. Survey items elicit information on the respondent's computer-related knowledge, skills, experience with computers and use of computers. Other items measure the validity of the respondents' answers by testing actual knowledge of parts of the computer, languages, etc. A third type of item collects information on computer resources in the district, school and classroom. The validation items are not included on the document available from ERIC. They can be obtained by contacting: 1983 Computer Literacy Validation Items, National Center for Educational Statistics, Att: Brown Building, Rm. 600, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202. Over 350 items are included in the bank.

Pyrczak, Fred (1988). Diagnostic Tests for Computer Literacy. (ETS# TC016085 ETS#) This series of diagnostic tests was designed to pinpoint the strengths and weaknesses of students in minimal computer literacy skills. Administered via paper and pencil or disk (Apple) available from the author at California State University, School of Education in Los Angeles. Sixteen tests consist of 10 questions each. Items were based on curriculum guides acquired from schools with computer education courses. Test Acronyms: TIM(O) Grade Level(s): 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; Higher Education. General Notes: ITEMS: 10. Contact: Educational Testing Service (ETS) Test Collection Library Rosedale and Carter Roads Princeton, NJ 08541 (609) 734-5689

Stevens, Dorothy Jo (1980). Computers In Education Survey. (ETS# TC018351) The survey assesses the levels of expertise, knowledge, and attitudes of teachers in kindergarten through grade 12, teachers college faculty, and student teachers toward instruction to foster computer literacy. Some of the items assessed include computer literacy for high school students, instructional uses of computers: concerns and attitudes, general computer literacy index, computer anxiety, perceived levels of expertise, lack of hardware, lack of quality software, and lack of knowledgable teachers and support staff. Technical data are provided. (TJS) Material Notes: 1. Journal Article "How educators perceive computers in the classroom". See avail source. 2. Journal Article "Educators' perceptions of computers in education: 1979 and 1981", AEDS Journal;, 1-15, Contact: Association for Educational Data Systems Journal;, 221-32,
#prev#next#top#bottom

Computer Efficacy

Enoch, Larry G Others (1993). Microcomputer Utilization in Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument. (ETS# TC019038 ) This scale is a modified version of Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (TC019039), altered to study elementary and secondary school teachers' beliefs about utilizing computers in the classroom. It consists of two scales. The Personal Self-Efficacy scale contains 14 items and assesses teachers' beliefs in their own ability to utilize the microcomputer for effective instruction. The Outcome Expectancy scale contains seven items and assesses teachers' beliefs with regard to teacher responsibility for students' ability or inability to utilize the microcomputer in the classroom. On a five-point, Likert-type scale, teachers indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with each item. Teacher responses be used as a basis for developing and planning teacher inservice activities designed to improve teaching using computers. While this instrument was developed for use with elementary school science teachers, the items are not specific to science education. Technical data are included. (klm) Test Acronyms: MUTEBI

Murphy, Christine A Others (1989). Computer Self-Efficacy Scale. (ETS# TC018510 ) The 32-item Likert-type scale was developed to measure individuals' perceptions of their capabilities regarding specific computer-related knowledge and skills. Items represent beginning, moderate, and advanced computer skills. The items can also be found in Educational and Psychological Measurement;, 52, 3, 735-45, Aut, 1992. (mh) Test Acronyms: CSE Material Notes: 1. See avail source 2. Ed and Psych Measurement;, 52, 2 p735-45, Meier, Scott T. (1988). Computer Aversion Scale. (ETS# TC016925 ) A true-false instrument designed to measure individuals' aversions to using computers. Aversion is measured according to three factors: efficacy expectations, outcome expectations, and reinforcement expectations. be administered to individuals who are in a situation where they take a computerized or paper-and-pencil version of other tests so that test administrators can determine the best format for their clients. Test Acronyms: CAVS General Notes: ITEMS: 31.

Murphy, Christine A Others (1989). Computer Self-Efficacy Scale. (ETS# TC018510) The 32-item Likert-type scale was developed to measure individuals' perceptions of their capabilities regarding specific computer-related knowledge and skills. Items represent beginning, moderate, and advanced computer skills. The items can also be found in Educational and Psychological Measurement;, 52, 3, 735-45, Aut, 1992. (mh) Test Acronyms: CSE Material Notes: 1. See avail source 2. Ed and Psych Measurement;, 52, 2, 735-45, Contact: Educational and Psychological Measurement;, 49, 4, 893-99,Webster, Jane Martocchio, Joseph J. (1992). Microcomputer Playfulness Scale (CPS). (ETS# TC019801) The Microcomputer Playfulness Scale (CPS) was developed to measure cognitive spontaneity in use of computers. It uses a 7-point likert-type scale to measure 22 traits. It is self administered. A seven item measure is also available. It has been used with college students. Reliability and validity are discussed. (JW) Test Acronyms: CPS Material Notes: 1. Article reprint. See availability source. Contact: MIS Quarterly, 0276-7783, 16, 201-26, 1992.

Riggs, Iris, M Enochs, Larry G (1993). Microcomputer Beliefs Inventory (MBI). (ETS# TC019336 ) The Microcomputer Beliefs Inventory (MBI) is a 26-item, 5-point Likert scale developed to assess the self-efficacy and outcome expectancy beliefs of students in grades 6, 7, and 8 toward computers. In a study using the MBI, t-tests revealed a strong relationship between prior experience with a computer at home and computer-specific beliefs. Technical data are provided in the availability source. (MH) Test Acronyms: MBI Material Notes: 1. MBI scoring instructions 2. Article reprint: "A Microcomputer Beliefs Inventory for Middle School Students; Scale Development and Validation." See avail source.
#prev#next#top#bottom

Others Measures of Interest

_____ (1990). Student Occupational Competency Achievement Test: Business Data Processing. Corporation: National Occupational Competency Testing Institute. (ETS# TC017162) This test is part of a program developed to evaluate secondary and postsecondary vocational students with a standardized, objective measure. Each test consists of a multiple-choice portion covering factual knowledge, technical information, understanding of principles and problem solving abilities related to the occupation. A performance component samples manipulative skills required. A mental ability test is also available. The written test covers computer literacy, business related computer functions, computer operations, general software applications, systems/computer programming. Test Acronyms: NOCTI SOCAT Contact: National Occupational Competency Institute

_____ (1994). Praxis II: Subject Assessments, Business and Technology. Corporation: Educational Testing Service. (ETS# TC019369) The Praxis series assessments provide measures of academic achievements and proficiencies for students entering or completing college or provisional teacher preparation programs and for individuals in professional areas. The tests can provide information helpful to policymakers in making licensing decisions, to educational institutions in evaluating programs, and to examinees in assessing their own subject and/or pedagogical knowledge. Praxis II: Subject Assessments measure prospective teachers' knowledge of the subjects they will teach. The tests consist of multiple-choice questions and constructed-response questions. The tests in the Business and Technology area include accounting; agriculture; business; computer literacy/data processing; cooperative education; data processing; home economics education; marketing; office technology; secretarial skills; technology education and vocational Test Acronyms: Praxis II Subject Assessments Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers Contact: Teacher Programs and Services, Educational Testing Service, P. O. Box 6051, Princeton, NJ 08541 (last known address).

Betz, Nancy E. Hackett, Gail (1981). Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES). (ETS# TC018543 ) The Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES) measures the career self-efficacy of 10 traditionally male and 10 traditionally female occupations. Occupations were designated as "traditional" if 70% or more of the people employed in it were women. They were designated as "nontraditional" if 30% or less of the people employed in it were women. The level of self-efficacy expectations is assessed by asking subjects whether or not they could: 1) successfully complete the required education or training for the occupation; and 2) successfully perform the duties of the occupation. (JL) Test Acronyms: OSES Material Notes: 1. 1. Article reprint. See availability source. 2. Article reprint in Journal of Vocational Behavior, 40, 14-32, 1992

Clement, Sarah (1985). Occupational Questionnaire. (ETS# TC810700 ETS#) The Occupational Questionnaire was developed for a study of male and female self-efficacy in relation to traditionally male occupations. The questionnaire consists of brief descriptions of 20 occupations. Each description is followed by three questions relating to the subjects' expectations about their abillity to perform the job, how much they like each occupation, and the extent to which they have considered entering each occupation. Of the 20 occupations, 10 were traditionally male and 10 were traditionally female. A male or female occupation was defined as one in which more than 70 percent of the members were male or female, respectively. Results of the study indicated that females have lower self-efficacy than men when considering traditionally male occupations but there was no evidence that this deterred them from considering entering male occupations. (MH) Test Acronyms: TIM(T) Material Notes: 1. questionnaire 2. article reprint in Journal of Occupational Psychology;, 60, 257-65, 1987 Contact: Educational Testing Service (ETS) Test Collection Library Rosedale and Carter Roads Princeton, NJ 08541 (609) 734-5689

Taylor, Karen M Betz, Nancy E. (1983). Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE). (ETS# TC018856 ) The Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE) was designed to measure the effect individuals' self-efficacy on their ability to make career decisions. The instrument consists of 50 items covering 5 career choice competencies: accurate self- appraisal; gathering occupational information; goal selection; making plans for the future; and problem solving. Each competency contains 10 items. On a 10-point, Likert-type scale, respondents indicate the degree of confidence they have in their ability to successfully complete each task. The instrument be used to study the relationship between college students' self-efficacy when making career decisions and their ability to make career decisions. Technical data are included. (KM) Test Acronyms: CDMSE Material Notes: 1. Article reprint. See availability source. 2. Article reprint. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 0748-1756, 26, 2, 137-42, 1993.

z. old... Griswold, Philip A. (1983). Computer Use Questionnaire. (ETS# TC018329) An instrument to measure computer literacy among teachers. It consists of 20 items and is based on a 3-part rating scale with response options ranging from "strongly agree to strongly disagree". Several characteristics of teachers, including social implications, related to the awareness of computer use are identified. These characteristics include mathematical skills, age, and sex. Psychological attributes have also been identified as being associated with computer use in education. These attributes are locus of control, extraversion and apprehension of computer technology, cognitive style, and perceived effectiveness of computer managed instruction. The Minnesota Educational computer consortium (MECC) has organized a set of criteria to describe computer literacy: computer applications, limitations, software, programming, and enjoyment. (TJS) Test Acronyms: MECC Material Notes: 1. Journal Article "Some Determinants of Computer Awareness Among Education Majors". See avail source. Contact: Association For Educational Data System (AEDA) Journal;, 16, 2, 92-103,
#prev#next#top#bottom

Contact Us

Enter feedback, comments, questions, or suggestions:

Enter your name:

Enter email address (if you have one):

Send us your comments.

Email this page

Add or change any text to your message in the text field below:

Enter recipient's email address:

Enter your name (optional):

Enter your email address (optional):

Send this page.

List Folder Contents

 

101 Considerations About Technology

Assessment Instruments and Design Issues

Computer Applications (2001)

Computer Efficacy (2001)

Computer Efficacy Links (2001)

Computer Self-Efficacy Survey (FORM)

Distance Learning

Faculty Service Needs Assessment

Instructional Television

Internet Links

Issues and Policy

Lesson Activities

NM Competencies for Entry-Level Information Technology Coordinators

NM Technology Competencies for All Teachers

Organizations and Technical Assistance

Presentation Software: Books

Professional Development

Provocative Propositions

Publications

Research and Theory

Research Instruments

Resources

Self-Efficacy

Syllabus

Teachers and Technology (2001)

Technology Competencies (2001)

Technology Equity (1999)

Technology for Teachers

Technology Rubrics

Understanding Databases (2001)

What we need to know

Word Processing (2001)

List Utilities

 

Search
Quick Search
(Best for current topics)
Enter keywords:

exact match
Google

(Indexed quarterly)
positivepractices.com
WWW
Translations

Caution: Machine generated language translations may contain significant errors. Use with care.

Google Translations
AltaVista Translations

About UsContact UsHelpPoliciesSiteMap#Top

Update: